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Bereavement & Grief

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Bereavement refers specifically to the process of recovering from the death of a loved one. Grief is a reaction to any form of loss. Both encompass a range of feelings from deep sadness to anger, and the process of adapting to a significant loss can vary dramatically from one person to another, depending on his or her background, beliefs, relationship to what was lost, and other factors.

Grief is associated with feelings of sadness, yearning, guilt, regret, and anger, among others. Some people may experience a sense of meaninglessness, and others can feel a sense of relief. Emotions are often surprising in their strength or mildness, and they can also be confusing, such as when a person misses a painful relationship.
 
Thoughts during grief can vary from “there’s nothing I can do about it” to “it’s my fault, I could have done more” or from “she had a good life” to “it wasn’t her time.” They can be troubling or soothing, and people in grief can bounce between different thoughts as they make sense of their loss. Grieving behaviors run from crying to laughter, and from sharing feelings to engaging silently in activities like cleaning, writing, or exercising. Some people find comfort in the company of others, particularly with those who may be similarly affected by the loss, and others may prefer to be alone with their feelings.

Everyone grieves in their own way and in their own time. Most people recover from grief and resume normal activities within six months, though they continue to feel moments of sadness. Others may feel better after about a year, and sometimes people continue to grieve for years without seeming to improve or find relief even temporarily. Grief can be complicated by other conditions, most notably depression, or by the person’s level of dependency on the departed.
 
No one way of grieving is better than any other. Some people are more emotional and dive into their feelings; others are stoic and may seek distraction from dwelling on an unchangeable fact of living. While many difficult and complicated emotions are associated with the grieving process, experiences of joy, contentment, and humor are not absent during this difficult time. Self-compassion, physical exercise, and strong social support can all contribute to alleviating some of the most challenging aspects of grief.

One of the many challenges associated with grieving the loss of a loved one, whether to death or the dissolution of a relationship, is adjusting to the new reality of living in the absence of the loved one. This often requires developing a new routine, envisioning a new future, and even adopting a new sense of identity.

How therapy can help:

Bereavement counselling offers a warm, empathic, safe and confidential environment in which the therapist and you collaboratively work towards:

  • Working through the many feelings associated with your loss
  • Coping with the stressors associated with your loss
  • Finding ways to manage the range of symptoms you experience

 

Contact us now in confidence at Arduna @ (01) 833 2733 to discuss making an appointment with one of our therapists who can help you with bereavement problems.

THERAPISTS WHO SPECIALISE IN THIS AREA:
To get more information on an individual therapist please click on name

Adie Clarke
Andrew McLellan
Anne O'Leary
Betty Maguire
Brendan Murphy
Brigid Coyle
Carol Owens
Eamonn Boland
Gail McGuinness
Gustavo Bernstein
Jean Forbes
Juliet Smith
Luminita Buzescu
Margaret Costello
Nadezhda Almqvist
Natalya Price
Peter Caffrey
Ranite Lynch
Sinead Carroll
Susan Dowling
Tara Dunphy
Theresa Cawley